Black Mtn, and a new low start…

•2014/11/14 • Leave a Comment

Anthony Tarascio added a low start to a standing v4 (pun intended) called Pride. He was hesitant to name it something new but ended up calling it Roar of Pride, v10 or 11.

The start of the low to Pride with Tarascio in the start position.

The start of the low to Pride with Tarascio in the start position.

This is his description:

“The stand start starts about 3 1/2 ft almost directly above my right hand on a small but good undercling and flat left hand edge. In the photo I am setting up for the first move which is a hard drive by out of an awkward drop knee to a ok right hand edge. Move feet out right, slap left hand to better incut, move feet higher and then a blind dyno with my left hand to a jug (second hold of stand start).

The starting holds are a horrible right hand crystal edge and very small but slightly incut crimp for the left[.]”

Sounds hard. Nice work Anthony! Pride is located around the west side of the mountain from the OK Corral area, and it sits facing mostly south. He’d tried it a few times between the end of the last season and the start of this season but sent it when the weather finally became favorable.

Adamantium low… and thoughts on FA behavior.

•2014/10/24 • 3 Comments

On Thursday, Matt Birch did Adamantium Low on his first try. It was impressive to watch him! I had done the problem in the past before the start crimp had broken, or so I’ve heard. I repeated the start move, feeling it was about the same. Jon Wright and I thought the original line was v9. Matt had just recently flashed a 10 in Toulumne that he felt was soft but thought this line was a bit harder… maybe 10? Does anyone know of any changes to Adamantium in recent years?

Adamantium, v9 or 10. Matt Birch on his first go send. This is the first move to a high horizontal.

Adamantium, v9 or 10. Matt Birch on his first go send. This is the first move to a high horizontal.

Continue reading ‘Adamantium low… and thoughts on FA behavior.’

A followup… Part 3: Efficiency

•2014/09/30 • Leave a Comment

I’ve decided to write this to better clarify what I mean by efficient movement, and because I referenced efficiency in the ST posts, it’s important to reduce any confusion; as a result, here is my take on the topic of efficiency. Part of the reason for my motivation arises from a simulator session while on plastic with some friends that resulted in a discussion on efficiency in movement stemming from a problem I set whose crux was more movement specific than strength/power specific.

Aparté, Apremont Sully.

Aparté, Apremont Sully.

Continue reading ‘A followup… Part 3: Efficiency’

Hawk at the park, and other sundry things

•2014/09/12 • Leave a Comment

Here’s a nice change up from climbing. It’s a short video of a Coopers Hawk feeding on it’s kill (or carrion, not sure but it looks fresh). This was shot a Hart Park in Orange, CA, an old school buildering crag with some of the nastiest vert traverse crimping I can remember. The hawk is oblivious to this history, of course, but some random guy walked up with the intention of seeing if the hawk would drop it’s kill, and it did, then the guy continued after the hawk. Bizarre. Anyways, here is the guy walking after the bird…

Coopers Hawk is to right of walking man...

Coopers Hawk is to right of walking man…

More images and a neato video of that Coopers Hawk after the break!

Continue reading ‘Hawk at the park, and other sundry things’

System Training, part 2

•2014/09/08 • 12 Comments

Here is part 2 of my ST overview. In my previous post, I laid out the framework for the wall and then went on to explain details about feet and turnout. I also explained what the basic body position is between movements up the wall, and why it is significant. In this post, I will go into detail about the movement one practices based on the hold type. As important as the resting foundational body position (FBP) is, so is everything one does while moving between holds. I don’t have many photos this time, but I do have a real world example Jill shot of me while in font. This example does lend credence to why I chose to do a specific move on a specific problem that usually isn’t done with my chosen beta. Here is one of the photos:

El Poussah. This ultra classic problem (stand) is usually performed with a toe or heal hook on the chalked sloper above my right foot.

El Poussah. This ultra classic problem (stand) is usually performed with a toe or heel hook on the chalked sloper above my right foot.

UPDATED: I forgot to add photos of the workout positions. They are now included within the body of text.

Continue reading ‘System Training, part 2′

System Training, part 1

•2014/09/06 • 12 Comments

Here is the more in-depth explanation of system training (ST). My original post was rather ambiguous and difficult to comprehend, so hopefully this will elucidate things. (All photos were taken at the Factory Bouldering gym.) Btw, the Factory Bouldering gym has the only system wall I know of in socal, and it’s angle is about 30˚… good for intermediates with moderately stable shoulders. Beginners with strong shoulders can use it too.

FBP (better--I'm using a lower foot where my plumb line ends up behind me; therefore I need to 'draw' myself under/forward with my feet.)

FBP (better–I’m using a lower foot where my plumb line ends up behind me; therefore I need to ‘draw’ myself under/forward with my feet.)

FBP (worse--In this photo, I've chosen a higher foot that allows my center line to reside along the plumb line effectively allowing me to do nothing except maintain form)

FBP (worse–In this photo, I’ve chosen a higher foot that allows my center line to reside with the plumb line effectively allowing me to do little except maintain form)

FBP (useless--Here I'm just hanging with no intent to control turnout, posture, or link upper to lower torso)

FBP (useless–Here I’m just hanging with no intent to control turnout, posture, or link upper to lower torso)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this post, I’ll detail the layout for one type of hold (all have the same arrangement but fitting them all on one wall can be a bit tricky), and explain the foundational body position (FBP) that is the precursor to what is often times referred to as a ‘system move.’ After that, in the next installment, I’ll explain the different workout rules the Huber’s used with an explanation for why I think they chose to do this. Basically, there are 3 different rules used for different hold types with one dominant rule (I’ll call #1) governing all except the thin crimp and slopers. Thin crimps require the body position to be locked off while slopers require the action of cutting loose, controlling it then returning to rule #1 positioning.

Continue reading ‘System Training, part 1′

System Training… coming soon, very soon

•2014/09/04 • 2 Comments

I’ve written the post on System Training but need photos. Everyone needs photos, hell without them, we’d all be photo-less. ;) I plan to shoot some images tomorrow then upload Part 1 by the weekend. Part 2 will come very shortly after. Part 1 starts with an introduction then covers Holds, Feet, Body Form and Turnout. Part 2 covers Movement, Body Tension, Routine and Final Thoughts. Cumulatively speaking, it’s about 4+ pages, so making it two parts should minimize the negative impact to your enjoyment or concentration skills.

After that, I’ll begin the final edit of my commentary on guidebooks with references to the new upcoming Black Mountain Guidebook (based on their publicly released PDF sample).

Since we didn’t commit to buying the summer pass for the tram, we’re avoiding going outside. We have gone for a hike in Joshua Tree at the beginning of August when it finally rained in socal but without climbing. Our hike took us to a ‘new’ area for us, but the big boulders have top anchors; regardless, the boulders are worth bouldering, whether or not they’ve only been TR’d. We plan to take another hike to a nearby area as this region has stellar rock, either fine grain or large grain, but solid all the same. This means we can increase the number of projects, already numbering over 80 and feel even more frustrated! Yay for frustration as long as there are new lines to climb.

 
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