Snakes in the Coquibus.

Or is it rattlesnakes and cobras? In Coquibus (sud) L’Auvergne, we went to the Little Cobra boulder according to Thierry’s suggestion that coincided with Frigault’s guidebook. The boulder has a distinctly large overhang with underclings in the middle. The left flank has a sloper shelf leading to the lip slopers along the front of the boulder. The left side is hampered by another boulder touching the Cobra boulder just where that sloper shelf meets the front lip of the boulder.

Little Cobra, 7a+. A punchy 7a+ even by a local bleausard's account. We were both rather mesmerized by my next hand hold... In Thierry's defense, my right hand is on a jug. Crux to come...

Little Crotale, 7a+. A punchy 7a+ even by a local bleausard’s account. We were both rather mesmerized by my next hand hold… In Thierry’s defense, my right hand is on a jug. Crux to come…

The left topout runs perilously close to dabbing, and the left start has the same problem. Though it’s relatively easy to avoid the adjacent boulder, the center start and the right finish have no interference. For this reason, the center start that exits right is the most aesthetic line to us. The gB has no reference to this option other than doing a harder option eliminit that uses only the underclings and goes straight to the right side of the boulder lip. This gets a 7b+ rating, called King Cobra, while the left start to right finish, Crotale, goes at 7b and the left start to left finish at 7a+, Little Crotale. Climbing the underclings straight out to the left finish (it’s actually straight up) is called Little Cobra, 7a+. Regardless, Jill and I thought the left finish to be hardest of the topouts. This, of course, makes little sense, making Crotale (left start/right finish) hardest of the four standard options, sans eliminit, King Cobra.

The beginning of the crux topout. Moi in action spotting.

The beginning of the crux topout. Moi in action spotting.

Another failed attempt at the exit of Little Crotale. I found another way to exit it with good friction: right hand stays on that low right sloper and the left goes multiple times to the high crimp barely visible at top of chalk.

Another failed attempt at linking the exit of Little Crotale from the start. I found another way to exit it with good friction: right hand stays on that low right sloper and the left goes multiple times to the high crimp barely visible at top of chalk.

I say they all go at 7a+, some hard, some easy. We skipped the eliminit as it just wasn’t appealing. Our first visit was with Thierry, where we did just the straight up line Little Crotale. Punchy for 7a+. After he left, Jill continued to work on the send while I sent the other two options, Little Cobra and Crotale. Jill left the boulder frustrated.

Little Cobra, 7a+. The start.

Little Cobra, 7a+. The start.

I felt this start was harder than the Crotale start at left, but probably not a full grade different.

I felt this start was harder than the Crotale start at left, but probably not a full grade different.

 

A few days later, after climbing most of the day elsewhere, we returned so Jill could bag the send. She did send Crotale but not Little Crotale while I did the more aesthetic 4th line, not in the gB: center underclings to right finish which I will call Big Cobra, 7a+. Way cool problem. The boulder has 4 7a+’s all worth doing. Jill also thought the right exit of Crotale wasn’t harder than Little Crotale (although she never sent that problem, she did do the left exit multiple times).

The same rain event that fell on us and the blue tarp earlier that dayin Buthiers. Maybe blue tarps are the next big thing in bouldering!!!!! Not.

The same rain event that fell on us and the blue tarp earlier that day in Buthiers. Maybe blue tarps are the next big thing in bouldering!!!!! Not.

Running through the moves in her head...

Running through the moves in her head…

The intro moves of Crotale's right start.

The intro moves of Crotale’s right start.

One of the traverse moves to the right exit.

One of the traverse moves to the right exit.

7+8 doesn’t cover this area much calling it ‘sensitive.’ Frigault doesn’t seem to worry much but does point out the sensitivity of the area and its low impact policy: no painting of circuits, minimize chalk use (a bit arbitrary but good idea), avoid damaging vegetation (reasonable).

 

Advertisements

~ by r. mulligan on 2014/05/17.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: