Sully and straight: Aprémont

Here are some shots of problems from a few weeks ago that we found to be really enjoyable. While some were ambiguous others were aesthetic. The forest was mostly quiet. One pair passed through, a few others walked the main trail through the crag. There could have been more breeze, the sun was not strong. The crag, Aprémont Sully, was peaceful.

An unknown easy problem  left of  . Full value start matched at left heel.

An unknown easy problem left of an Unnamed 5+. Full value start matched at left heel.

... following the line through.

… following the line through.

An unnamed 5+/6a corner with fully value top.

An unnamed 5+/6a corner with fully value top.

Reaching her limit and using an intermediate. It all worked well.

Reaching her limit to reach an intermediate.

The 'crimp' finally reached off a high smear.

The ‘crimp’ finally reached off a high smear.

Another warmup was a cool but short mantel.

After the sit...

After the sit start.

Le Gars du 95, 6c+.

Le Gars du 95, 6c+.

That balance point.

That balance point.

A open-starred Unnamed 5+ crimp ‘wall:’

A starred Wall, that was cool, but maybe not so starred.

A starred Wall, that was cool, but maybe not so starred.

Now into grade 7 territory, at La Pouce, we question what the line is with an ambiguous handhold, and find a simple fix.

A big move to a killer sloper rail and some neat footwork. Just up and left of the wide chalked sloper is a wide pinch in the shadow. We used it the first send.

A big move to a killer sloper rail and some neat footwork. Just up and left of the wide chalked sloper is a wide pinch in the shadow. We used it for the first send.

That pinch allows us to pull straight to the top then shuffle over to the right exit using a high right heel.

That pinch allows us to pull straight to the top then shuffle over to the right exit using a high right heel.

The start.

The start.

Skipping that left pinch changed the program in a big way. Though forced, this was the preferred sequence for maximum enjoyment.

Skipping that left pinch changed the program in a big way. Though forced, this was the preferred sequence for maximum enjoyment.

Finish sequence commencing as she exits the toe hook.

Finish sequence commencing as she exits the toe hook.

Showing the toe hook we both used.

Showing the toe hook we both used.

After a foot shuffle, she sticks another compression intermediate.

After a foot shuffle, she sticks another compression intermediate.

Finally sticking the good sidepull.

Finally sticking the good sidepull.

Now wasn’t that way more enjoyable? Yup, we thought so too. We then ventured over to see what’s doable without cleaning. Aparté.

Aparté, 6c. The moves, the line, the commitment. Super cool.

Aparté, 6c. The moves, the line, the commitment. Super cool.

An exit move.

An exit move.

That’s the line. There are two moves that are long extensions, one is reaching the upper sloper that my right hand is on. The first is underneath.

This move into the undercling is worth doing if you can reach it.

This move into the undercling is worth doing if you can reach it.

After reaching the undercling, doing the backstop yields the sloper rail.

After reaching the undercling, doing the backstop yields the sloper rail.

A worthy line at 6c.

A worthy line at 6c that Raaij gives an open star in 5+6.

La forét bouldering.

La forét bouldering.

By night, we walked to check out another open star problem in 5+6, en Grés Sage (assis), 6a. There are four lines, with stand and sit versions for a direct and left finish: … Sage and … Nage (direct). The direct made no sense unless the line went directly above the start holds from the sit, used by both sit versions. This first shot (sorry, shot at night with headlamps only) shows the start and how far right it is to the obvious left finish, being it’s a sloper rail that trends left.

From the sit, this is the first move crossover style. Right hand was on the sidepull right of the left hand.

From the sit, this is the first move crossover style. Right hand was on the sidepull right of the left hand.

From here direct would go pretty much straight up, but it’s covered in lichen, uncleaned seemingly for a very long time. If one is to climb by shuffling hands a few times up the rail, the next exit is the easiest onto a cool sloper shelf (which we climbed from the sit but found it an easier exit). The only obvious next exit is the …Sage, or left exit. We wanted to do all four, but ended up doing two, the sit, En Grés Sage (assis), and another slightly right exit.

We climbed the 'almost' direct line visible by chalk, but it's obvious here why we went all the way left.

The topout of the left exit. The harder 6b version probably rocks over the lowest chalked sidepull then stands up to reach the top, I’m guessing.

On another day, we went to the Aprémont (not one of the other 6 named versions) main area. Here are a few of the lines.

Jill working Égoïste (assis), 7a+ with two french men in team Verte.

Jill working Égoïste (assis), 7a+ with two french men in team Verte.

Égoïste is an excellent line, one given a solid star for the sit by Raaij in 7+8, 2nd ed. The ‘green team’ of two young and strong frenchmen were very cheerful and motivated, but neither sent the line. One guy got serious and did sans team jersey.

This guy almost sent with a similar method to mine in matching, but no luck. I matched right behind the left while he tried to shuffle side-by-side.

This guy almost sent with a similar method to mine in matching, but no luck. I matched right behind the left while he tried to shuffle side-by-side. Jill ended up sending with a his match style.

This is Knees, 7a. Low ball.

This is Knees, 7a. Low ball.

The 3 of us did this 3 ways. Between the giant start hueco, limited ground space, and poorly angled good holds, Jill got credit for the most direct sequence, Thierry the most complex, though he sent first. He basically works compression until he can go big to the far right long hueco.

Jill goes directly big using a killer knee bar in the tight hueco underneath.

Jill goes directly big using a killer knee bar in the tight hueco underneath.

Showing why it's called Knees.

Showing why it’s called Knees.

My sequence was a combination of reaching the hueco faster than Thierry, but using his finish sequence. No knee bars for me. :(

My sequence was a combination of reaching the hueco faster than Thierry, but using his finish sequence. No knee bars for me. 😦

Cool toe hook move to set up the exit moves.

Cool toe hook move to set up the exit moves.

At sunset, we finished with Clin d'Œil, 6c+/7a. Jill had to send on another day.

At sunset, we finished with Clin d’Œil, 6c+/7a. Jill had to send on another day.

Clin d'Œil.

Clin d’Œil.

This problem fit me well.

This problem fit me well.

We tried a problem to the left of Knees called le Nostromo, 7b+/7b, but found one of the moves very hard. That guy that sans his green shirt did it shortly before we met up with him at Égoïste. Warmups around these problems weren’t that great.

We did eye chalk on what appeared to be a new line left of Égoïste(not in the 2nd edition of 7+8). If follows a right trending sloper arete pretty much like many lines in Squamish. And we did spot TD from BC. Connect the dots…

La forêt.

La forêt.

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~ by r. mulligan on 2014/04/02.

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