some images from Squamish

We are currently at the Squamish Public Library while it rains outside. Since intermittent rains have arrived, the temps have finally dropped to respectable levels. Just before the last showers, the high peaked at over 86, or 30 c. We’ve been here now for over two weeks, and the crowds are gone. It’s a busy and fast growing city, though, and weekends still get the Vancouver visitors. We’ve tentatively made the Walmart lot our evening home; it’s free with bathrooms till 10 pm.

bigglesworth stand jc1

Jill about to reach for the crux sloper on mr. bigglesworth stand.

Internet can be had at the Library, Adventure Center, McDonald’s, Starbucks, and Home Depot (marginal) from outside if parked appropriately. Inside works well too. We’ve mainly spent our time checking boulders out and deciding what to try when the weather cools down. Lots of “effort” and moderates sent, and for me, some repeats. This post is all about Jill; I either did the problem previously or flailed. Neither seem relevant unless noted.

cruising airtight garage, v7?? she repeated it twice more while I flailed

cruising airtight garage, v7?? she repeated it twice more while I flailed

Jill thought Airtight Garage was easier than josh v5’s! Yikes! The irony is that the problem gets a reach symbol in the guidebook. She used a super high backstop on the best foot hold on the face. It might be 7 if you’re tall. That’s how it felt for me; I’ve sent it years earlier, oh well.

on one of many unsuccessful attempts while trying anubis

on one of many unsuccessful attempts while trying anubis

Jill finally sent Anubis on her second day! What a difference the two problems pose for her. I tried the sit to Mr. Bigglesworth but no success. My first day on felt super solid once I figured out how to do a true sit start on one pad. Second day was like I’d never tried it before.

doing the big move right on the v5 variant.

doing the big move right on the v5 variant, Alien Skull.

The straight up v3, Alien Within, is said by the gB to be reachy. Neither it or the 5 going right were reachy for someone 5′ 4″. For a short person, the move is pretty cool, not because it’s different but because the person can’t be sloppy. The next two images show the setup then the full reach: it’s all leg work as she keeps her arm mostly straight and does a rotating mantle using the left turned out leg to raise her to the top. Cool.

setting up the heel off a toe hook

setting up the heel off a toe hook

originally, she had a real hard time with this move because she matched. once she left her right shoulder extended, it became a simple mantle.

originally, she had a real hard time with this move because she matched. once she left her right shoulder extended, it became a simple mantle.

According the to gB, the third variant, Gull Skull, 6 points, reaches the arete then up and is given the most stars, 4. The straight up line gets 3 stars even though it’s the pure line. I admit it’s not that neat given it’s one move, but it represents no forced effort. The middle line, Alien Skull gets 2 stars. Huh? I don’t see the distinction unless having more moves is better, or certain moves are better. I call it 3 stars for all 3. The right exit to the arete is noticeably harder then the first two. I say v3, v4, v6.

These next images aren’t very good as they were shot at iso 12800 and 25600; I was lazy and didn’t want to use a flash. The shots show the sit (v7) for Tim’s Sloper Problem, v5. Both the line and the gB information are interesting for several reasons. The gB says it’s more difficult if you’re tall, which is true, and doesn’t rate it highly (2 stars), whereas the stand is a top100.  That means the sit should suck. I admit working the moves out does pose a bit of a challenge, but when it was all said and done, we both found that the sit made climbing the line more worthwhile. The stand ended up feeling like a meager topout problem without any substance: two easy moves then a sequential exit encounter. The reason the sit added so much was that the sequence ended up making the cramped space almost (not quite if you have long arms) irrelevant. The potential problem affects those with long arms as any pad is problematic for the two first moves: straight arms are a no-go. I had to lock a few degrees up because I kept a thin 1″ Evolv pad underneath. I also have a long torso, but it didn’t affect the move; only long arms.

Another reason is that exiting right is a worthy effort but most-likely if you do the sit; it adds one more sustained shoulder move off a high right rock-over foot. This exit isn’t in the gB, but we thought it would make for an easier 7. I did this right exit because it appears that the primary line of Tim’s Sloper Problem is contrived. In a technical sense, it is. The right exit is the easiest, especially if you only do the stand, but from the sit, the margin is so small that it’s splitting hairs at easy vs. moderate or moderate vs. hard v7 for the two exits from the sit; therefore, I recommend doing the sit, and exiting right too, if it’s within your ability.

about to touch rock from the first move. note the right foot and her back above the pad

about to touch rock with the left hand from the first move. note the left foot and her back above the pad

here jill is about to start reaching for the high sloping shelf. even closer to the pad

here jill is about to start reaching for the high sloping shelf. even closer to the pad

getting the feet around can be problematic being tall but not as bad as the first two moves. the right exit uses a poor seem gaston just above the left hand on the sloping shelf

getting the feet around can be problematic being tall but not as bad as the first two moves. the right exit uses a poor seam gaston just above the left hand on the sloping shelf with the high right foothold just out of view on the right

note: I dabbed on both attempts at doing the sit straight up. the first one was to push an overly large pad out of the way of my shoulder. the second dab on the second go was my back touching. luckily, the right exit was done clean from the sit. ugh. I call the first dab a negative dab and the second a positive dab. in the nether world of non-ascents, the first, nD, is superior to the second type of dab, a pD or positive dab. Why you ask? because though neither exit is legit in the send world, pushing a pad out of the way constitutes a negative impact on my forward progression while a positive dab aids my forward progression. got it? but don’t forget, this is a nether-world discussion of non-ascents, nA.

note2: the stand is not a very awesome top100. the gB author does say it’s a super popular problem. I guess that’s one of the reasons for its inclusion then?

one last inclusion regarding problems with high dab potential: First Nations Native American Giver, v8. We both reached the summit, but Jill scored a pD, nA. Me, full credit, 8 units! Whoa! Fun line and so hard to avoid touching something.

first nations giver, v8

first nations giver, v8

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~ by r. mulligan on 2013/09/22.

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