a friendly bat visit and some confusing problem starts

Previous to my finger injury/unintended therapy work, we visited the Thunder Egg boulder before heading to my project lowball traverse that I’ve already mentioned. The Thunder Egg boulder has 6 established lines based on the gB. We warmed up on the northside 3, or tried to. There’s a stand start on the right face of the main overhang, p. 66 of the gB, and it goes at v1. For us, the stand felt like 5.4, so instead, we did it as a sit by grabbing a large key hold just below a lip and another hold lower. The next two lines on that overhang both start as low as possible, either at the corner or slightly left where it’s steepest.

we did a line starting one move lower than where Jill is at, right hand at where her right shoulder is.

we did a line starting one move lower than where Jill is at, right hand at where her right shoulder is.

NgB The gB regarding problem #56 (which is right of Jill’s head in the photo above):

“Yabo start at a rail on the lip of the low overhang.”

This refers to an incut that’s 1.5 feet above the rock. It was so awkward and difficult to keep from dabbing; we skipped it. Regarding problem #55:

“Yabo start as low as possible, then climb straight out the short steep overhang on jugs.”

Ok. This was very confusing because the lowest point is a flat but large rail below Jill’s left hand, at the apex of the roof. For a v3, this is absurd. It felt more like a v5 or 6 to move out and up. We started a problem with our left hand where Jill’s left is in the photo above and the right on a sloping crimp right of her right shoulder, and that felt like v4. We couldn’t find ANY jugs above! None. I think doing the problem as a lowball from that low flat rail would be a nice line, but I wasn’t interested in working it, just warming up. We then got on Robert’s own line called Thunder Egg, v6. NgB:

“Yabo start at the lowest thin crimps, move left a bit to a shallow “thunder egg” pocket, then crank to slopers on the lip of the boulder.”

This is what we found: a large slightly incut crimp low and left, too low to hang without being on the base boulder below, one thin crimp slightly higher and to the right, another good flat crimp above the incut low left crimp, and some very small crimps further right. We started with the thin crimp, and the flat crimp with a heel on the incut crimp. We thought it was maybe 4, not v6. We tried to start further right, but it got ambiguous to the point it seemed better to start far right where the middle line, problem #55 starts, or start at that low flat rail in the apex of the roof… yielding a potentially hard lowball start.

This is why I feel a named and graded problem should have distinct start holds; otherwise, it gets frustrating to want to repeat a known line.

Oh yeah, the bat!

Here is a Western Pipistrelle, oops, I mean Canyon bat.

Here is a Western Pipistrelle, oops, I mean Canyon bat.

I snapped this photo just as her strobe went off.

I snapped this photo just as her strobe went off.

It was very windy when we arrived, and it didn’t abate until later that evening. This little guy tried flying around but gave up and dived for cover. He’s officially called the Parastrellus Hesperus, or Canyon bat because the Euros had already named another bat the Pipistrelle.

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~ by r. mulligan on 2013/04/19.

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